» Stacks

A stack represents a collection of infrastructure that CDK for Terraform (CDKTF) synthesizes as a dedicated Terraform configuration. Stacks allow you to separate the state management for multiple environments within an application.

Hands-on: Try the Deploy Applications with CDK for Terraform tutorial on HashiCorp Learn.

» Scope

You can instantiate the same resource multiple times throughout your infrastructure. For example, you may want to create multiple S3 Buckets with different configurations. Instances that share the same stack parent element are considered to be part of the same scope. You must set a different name property for each instance to avoid naming conflicts.

Refer to the constructs documentation for more details and an example.

» Single Stack

The example below generates a single Terraform configuration in the configured output folder. When you run cdktf synth, the synthesized Terraform configuration will be in the folder cdktf.out/stacks/a-single-stack

import { Construct } from "constructs";
import { App, TerraformStack } from "cdktf";
import { AwsProvider, EC2 } from "./.gen/providers/aws";

class MyStack extends TerraformStack {
  constructor(scope: Construct, id: string) {
    super(scope, id);

    new AwsProvider(this, "aws", {
      region: "us-east-1",
    });

    new EC2.Instance(this, "Hello", {
      ami: "ami-2757f631",
      instanceType: "t2.micro",
    });
  }
}

const app = new App();
new MyStack(app, "a-single-stack");
app.synth();

» Multiple Stacks

Hands-on: Try the Deploy Multiple Lambda Functions with TypeScript tutorial on HashiCorp Learn. This tutorial guides you through a multi-stack application.

You can specify multiple stacks in your application. For example, you may want a separate configuration for development, testing, and production environments.

The example below synthesizes multiple Terraform configurations in the configured output folder.

import { Construct } from "constructs";
import { App, TerraformStack } from "cdktf";
import { AwsProvider, EC2 } from "./.gen/providers/aws";

interface MyStackConfig {
  environment: string;
  region?: string;
}

class MyStack extends TerraformStack {
  constructor(scope: Construct, id: string, config: MyStackConfig) {
    super(scope, id);

    const { region = "us-east-1" } = config;

    new AwsProvider(this, "aws", {
      region,
    });

    new EC2.Instance(this, "Hello", {
      ami: "ami-2757f631",
      instanceType: "t2.micro",
      tags: {
        environment: config.environment,
      },
    });
  }
}

const app = new App();
new MyStack(app, "multiple-stacks-dev", { environment: "dev" });
new MyStack(app, "multiple-stacks-staging", { environment: "staging" });
new MyStack(app, "multiple-stacks-production-us", {
  environment: "production",
  region: "us-east-1",
});
new MyStack(app, "multiple-stacks-production-eu", {
  environment: "production",
  region: "eu-central-1",
});
app.synth();

Running cdktf synth produces the following synthesized stacks.

$ cdktf list

Stack name                      Path
multiple-stacks-dev             cdktf.out/stacks/multiple-stacks-dev
multiple-stacks-staging         cdktf.out/stacks/multiple-stacks-staging
multiple-stacks-production-us   cdktf.out/stacks/multiple-stacks-production-us
multiple-stacks-production-eu   cdktf.out/stacks/multiple-stacks-production-eu

All Terraform operations are currently limited to a single stack, so you must specify a target stack directory to run diff, deploy or destroy. CDKTF emits an error if you omit the target stack and run a plain cdktf deploy. Please track this issue if you're interested in deploying multiple stacks at once.

To run multiple stacks at once, move them into the same directory and run cdktf deploy. For example, you could create a combined directory called multiple-stacks-dev, run cdktf deploy multiple-stacks-dev, and all Terraform operations will run in the folder cdktf.out/stacks/multiple-stacks-dev.

» Cross-Stack References

CDKTF does not yet support referencing resources from another stack automatically. You can achieve this manually with outputs and the remote state data source.

Please refer to this issue if you are interested in using cross-stack references.

» Migration from <= 0.2

Until version 0.2, CDKTF only supported a single stack. For local state handling, CDKTF used a terraform.tfstate in the project root folder. With version >= 0.3, the local state file reflects the stack name it belongs to in its file name. When a terraform.tfstate file is still present in the project root folder, it has to be renamed to match the schema terraform.<stack-name>.tfstate manually.

» Escape Hatch

For anything on the top-level terraform block that is not natively implemented, use the stack escape hatch to define a configuration. For example, define remote backend using the addOverride method in TypeScript.

stack.addOverride("terraform.backend", {
  remote: {
    organization: "test",
    workspaces: {
      name: "test",
    },
  },
});

The example above synthesizes a Terraform configuration with the remote backend included in the terraform block.

{
  "terraform": {
    "required_providers": {
      "aws": "~> 2.0"
    },
    "backend": {
      "remote": {
        "organization": "test",
        "workspaces": {
          "name": "test"
        }
      }
    }
  }
}